Quick Answer: Which Drug Is Given First To A Patient With Pulseless Electrical Activity Pea?

Why pea is not shockable?

In PEA, there is electrical activity, but the heart either does not contract or there are other reasons this results in an insufficient cardiac output to generate a pulse and supply blood to the organs..

Is Pea reversible?

Pulseless electrical activity (PEA), asystole, ventricular fibrillation (VFib or VF), and ventricular tachycardia (VTach or VT) may have a reversible cause in your patient (though most often PEA). The reversible causes of PEA can be remembered with a mnemonic of sorts, the H’s and T’s.

What are the causes of pea?

PEA is always caused by a profound cardiovascular insult (eg, severe prolonged hypoxia or acidosis or extreme hypovolemia or flow-restricting pulmonary embolus). The initial insult weakens cardiac contraction, and this situation is exacerbated by worsening acidosis, hypoxia, and increasing vagal tone.

What happens if you shock asystole?

A single shock will cause nearly half of cases to revert to a more normal rhythm with restoration of circulation if given within a few minutes of onset. Pulseless electrical activity and asystole or flatlining (3 and 4), in contrast, are non-shockable, so they don’t respond to defibrillation.

What are the 3 shockable rhythms?

Shockable Rhythms: Ventricular Tachycardia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Supraventricular Tachycardia.

What is the initial treatment for pea?

When treating PEA, epinephrine can be given as soon as possible but its administration should not delay the initiation or continuation of CPR. High-quality CPR should be administered while giving epinephrine, and after the initial dose, epinephrine is given every 3-5 minutes.

What drugs are used in pea?

Inotropic, anticholinergic, and alkalinizing agents are used in the treatment of pulseless electrical activity (PEA). As previously stated, resuscitative pharmacology includes epinephrine and atropine.

Which drug is considered first line treatment for asystole or PEA?

The only two drugs recommended or acceptable by the American Heart Association (AHA) for adults in asystole are epinephrine and vasopressin. Atropine is no longer recommended for young children and infants since 2005, and for adults since 2010 for pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole.

How do you treat pea rhythm?

Epinephrine should be administered in 1-mg doses intravenously/intraosseously (IV/IO) every 3-5 minutes during pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. Higher doses of epinephrine have been studied and show no improvement in survival or neurologic outcomes in most patients.

What rhythms can be defibrillated?

Defibrillation – is the treatment for immediately life-threatening arrhythmias with which the patient does not have a pulse, ie ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). Cardioversion – is any process that aims to convert an arrhythmia back to sinus rhythm.

Do you shock pulseless v tach?

VF and pulseless VT are shockable rhythms and treated in similar fashion. Asystole and PEA are also included in the cardiac arrest algorithm but are non-shockable rhythms. Ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia are treated using the left branch of the cardiac arrest arrest algorithm.

Which medication is the first one administered to a patient with pulseless electrical activity pea?

Treatment / Management The first step in managing pulseless electrical activity is to begin chest compressions according to the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol followed by administrating epinephrine every 3 to 5 minutes, while simultaneously looking for any reversible causes.