What Medications Help Eustachian Tube Dysfunction?

Which nasal spray is best for eustachian tube dysfunction?

TreatmentsOral decongestants.

These decongestants include pseudoephedrine (Sudafed) or phenylephrine (Sudafed-PE).Nasal decongestant sprays.

These nasal sprays include oxymetazoline (Afrin) or phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine).

Nasal steroid spray.

You can use nasal steroid spray every day for a few weeks to months..

Can Flonase help unclog ears?

Decongestants. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) may be helpful for the ear fullness and pressure. Nasal steroid sprays. Flonase, Nasacort, Nasonex, and others will help if your symptoms are due to allergies and nasal congestion.

Does ibuprofen help eustachian tube dysfunction?

These medications have been used to try and relieve nasal congestion and enable the Eustachian tube to open. If pain relief is needed, you can use medications such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In some cases, if the Eustachian tube does not open with other treatments, a myringotomy may be necessary.

Will antibiotics help eustachian tube dysfunction?

“Usually, antibiotics are not needed for the sensation of fullness, clicking and mild pressure. In fact, for just plain Eustachian tube dysfunction (or ETD) without infection or allergies, we do not really have a proven medical treatment that is any better than just ‘waiting it out. ‘

Can ETD last for months?

Another common cause of ETD is a cough or cold. Frequently people report having had a cold that got better, but left them with a blocked ear (or ears). It usually gets better in a week or two, but can last for months afterwards.

How do you unblock Eustachian tube naturally?

Close your mouth, hold your nose, and gently blow as if you are blowing your nose. Yawning and chewing gum also may help. You may hear or feel a “pop” when the tubes open to make the pressure equal between the inside and outside of your ears.

Can Eustachian tube dysfunction last for years?

If the tube is dysfunctional, symptoms such as muffled hearing, pain, tinnitus, reduced hearing, a feeling of fullness in the ear or problems with balance may occur. Long-term ETD has been associated with damage to the middle ear and the eardrum.

Can a doctor see a blocked eustachian tube?

ETD is often easily diagnosed during a visit to a doctor. The doctor may ask questions about hearing changes, pain in the ears, or feelings of pressure. They will also look inside the ear using an otoscope, checking for any signs of infection or blockages.

What medication is good for ear congestion?

Try an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen, to ease an earache or pain from sinus pressure. Try a decongestant . Over-the-counter tablets or nasal sprays can ease sinus blockage which in turn can relieve clogged ears.

What is the best treatment for eustachian tube dysfunction?

Eustachian tube dysfunction treatmentUsing a decongestant to reduce the swelling of the lining of the tubes.Taking an antihistamine or using a steroid nasal spray to reduce any allergic response.Making a tiny incision in the eardrum and suctioning out the fluid in the middle ear.More items…•

Does Benadryl help eustachian tube dysfunction?

If allergies are causing eustachian tube discomfort, you may consider over-the-counter allergy medications. Antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or cetirizine (Zyrtec, Aller-Tec, Alleroff) can reduce allergy symptoms and related ear problems.

How can I get rid of fluid behind my ear naturally?

If water does get trapped in your ear, you can try several at-home remedies for relief:Jiggle your earlobe. … Make gravity do the work. … Create a vacuum. … Use a blow dryer. … Try alcohol and vinegar eardrops. … Use hydrogen peroxide eardrops. … Try olive oil. … Try more water.More items…•

Can Zyrtec help eustachian tube dysfunction?

If ETD is caused by allergies, antihistamines such as Benadryl and Zyrtec may help you find relief. OTC pain relievers like Tylenol and Advil may also help relieve mild pain caused by ETD. If your symptoms last more than two weeks, see a doctor.

Do steroids help eustachian tube dysfunction?

Oral decongestants, topical decongestant or oral steroids may be prescribed to decrease the swelling at the Eustachian tube. Topical nasal steroids (fluticasone, plus many others) and oral antihistamines (loratadine, plus many others) may be used to treat allergies.

Does Claritin help eustachian tube dysfunction?

For inflamed eustachian tubes, antihistamines (like Claritin) and nasal corticosteroids (like Nasonex) help decrease the inflammation in the nasal passageways. If you know you have allergies, talk to your doctor about how you can best decrease inflammation caused by your allergies.

How do you unclog a eustachian tube?

There are several techniques you can try to unclog or pop your ears:Swallowing. When you swallow, your muscles automatically work to open the Eustachian tube. … Yawning. … Valsalva maneuver. … Toynbee maneuver. … Applying a warm washcloth. … Nasal decongestants. … Nasal corticosteroids. … Ventilation tubes.

Will Claritin help unclog my ears?

To additionally reduce the feeling of fullness in your ear, talk to your doctor or pharmacist about an antihistamine that includes a decongestant such as: cetirizine plus pseudoephedrine (Zyrtec-D) fexofenadine plus pseudoephedrine (Allegra-D) loratadine plus pseudoephedrine (Claritin-D)

Does ETD ever go away?

ETD is frequently mild and lasts only a few days. This is typically the case with the common cold, and no particular treatment is necessary. As previously noted, simple acts of swallowing, chewing, or yawning can be effective at alleviating symptoms.

Can ETD last for years?

So, it could be a few days…a few weeks…or, unfortunately, it could be months or years in severe cases, depending on the underlying causes. Swallow and chew. ETD is improved by swallowing, chewing gum, drinking, or yawning.

Can a doctor see your eustachian tube?

You can’t see the eustachian (pronounced you-STAY-shun) tube. It’s entirely inside your head, connecting the middle ear to the nasopharynx, the area at the very back of the nasal cavity near where it joins the throat (see illustration).